Can Genetic Analysis Come from Bone Marrow Biopsy?

Published on

Topics include: Understanding

Dr. Srdan Verstovsek and Dr. Carlos Bueso-Ramos, from MD Anderson Cancer Center, discuss analysis of the bone marrow biopsy. The experts describe how the sample is collected and explain the process each biopsy goes through in order to get the most optimal analysis.

 

The Ask the Expert series is sponsored through an educational grant to the Patient Empowerment Network from Incyte Corporation.

View more programs featuring and

Transcript

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

You go back and you take a sample, and you put it in the tubes.  Then you send it for the genetic analysis.  You send another sample for chromosomes.  These are finger?like structures that carry genes that we look whether they're broken or abnormal in these cells that we obtain.  So it is not only the looking under the microscope.  It's looking genetically.  What is wrong with these genes in these cells?  What is wrong with the chromosomes?  Another sample can go to another lab where we look at the proteins on the surface of these cells.  So multiple team members are involved all together to analyze as much as we can from the samples that we obtain. 

And, of course, the storage of the samples in the proper condition is paramount.  You just said we have a new mutation, which is present in many patients with myeloprolific neoplasms.  Those that have no JAK2 mutation likely have this calreticulin mutation that we call it.  Now we can go back with the sample set available, as we always store them.  We call this tissue bank.  We go to the tissue bank for a particular patient, and we can figure it out by applying our new techniques to the old stored patient samples to find new stuff, if you like, to put it simply, about a patient for the future. 

Andrew Schorr:

Although we do feel it. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

Related Programs

How Long Does a Biopsy Provide Useful Information?

With ever-changing medicine, will your biopsy still provide useful information in the future? Dr. Carlos Bueso-Ramos details the longevity of an MPN biopsy.

Published:

Published:

Rhonda Williams: The Power of Being Your Own Advocate

Rhonda, a patient living with a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN), polycythemia vera, was determined to get a diagnosis and seek out the best care possible.

Published:

Advertisement
Join Our Community Register for Events Read Our Latest Blog
Advertisement

Page last updated on May 28, 2014