[ Inglés] CAR T-Cell Therapy: What Does It Mean for Myeloma Patients?

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Topics include: Treatments and Understanding

Is CAR T-cell therapy in the future of treating multiple myeloma patients? Which patients are a good candidate for this type of immunotherapy? Our panel of myeloma experts, including Dr. Sagar Lonial, Dr. Carol Ann Huff and Dr. Suzanne Lentzsch, discuss patient response and its durability from the latest clinical trial results, and explain where immunotherapy research is headed next. Watch now to find out more about the use of CAR T-cell therapy for myeloma.

Produced by Patient Power. We thank you to thank AbbVie, Inc., Celgene and Takeda Oncology for their support

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Transcript

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Jenny Ahlstrom:        

Let’s talk about the CAR T-cell technology because I know an announcement came out from Celgene with some of their results, and they were being covered here. Do you want to begin about what you’re excited to see about this therapy?                                 

Dr. Lonial:                  

Yeah, I think if the CAR T cells in myeloma looked similar to what we saw with lymphoma or with ALL, I would actually be a little less impressed because I think, while the responses occur very high early on, a lot of those patients end up relapsing, and the durability of that response is not as deep or as long as I would have liked. Now, there are clearly some miraculous responses, and those are really good. But again, you have to look at everybody that’s getting treated, not just the long-term responders.

What we’re seeing from the Celgene Bluebird trial early on is that it looks like the responses are even higher, and those responses are quite durable and actually get better with longer follow-up.          That’s a small trial, but to me that’s a really exciting opportunity.

Jenny Ahlstrom:         

And we have others in the market, right? Novartis and Gilead or Kite pharma, and Juno Therapeutics. So Dr. Huff, what are you looking forward to?

Dr. Huff:

Well, I would agree. I’m looking forward to longer follow-up in more patients and better understanding.

I think there’s the toxicity of infusions, but we’re getting better at managing those sorts of things, and so I’m really anxiously waiting for longer follow-up to see where this goes. 

Dr. Lentzsch:              

Yeah, I think also over the next years, we need to decide what is the best technique to produce those CAR Ts? There are technical differences. Which kind of antiviral vector are you using? What is the best conditioning regiment? Do you give chemotherapy before or not? So there are some differences, and we need to do some fine-tuning. The data, I have to say, are not as impressive as they are for lymphoma or leukemia, so that’s why we have to wait. But definitely, there are discussions. Who is kind of doing the CAR T-cell therapy? Is it the myeloma doctor? Is it the transplant doctor? So I think we all probably see a future of the CAR T cells in multiple myeloma.

But there are other interesting concepts similar, for instance, the BiTEs, the BiTE-specific antibodies. Amgen just started a trial using a BiTE-specific antibody, a concept that you bind the myeloma cells with a BCMA antigen, and you bind the T cells, and you try to bring those cells together and enhance the killing of the myeloma cells. So this is another interesting concept, and it’s, for me, a CAR T kind of out of the shelf.

Jenny Ahlstrom:         

Right. And I’ve heard of hemibody approaches too, where they’re going after two targets plus the T cells, so that’s fascinating.

Dr. Lentzsch:              

Yeah, but the BiTE, Amgen is already in clinical testing, so that’s why it’s probably the most kind of advanced one, yeah.

Jenny Ahlstrom:         

Right, and the whole area of immunotherapy is exploding, it seems like. We are very thankful that you joined today and are very grateful that you are sharing your expertise here at the conference and with Patient Power, so thank you so much.   

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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Page last updated on April 2, 2018